Author Archives: Anita Rogers

SUPERUNKNOWN: The Art of Henry Mandell Sheds Light on the Unknown

Henry Mandell, Satoshi’s Garden 002F, 2023, UV polymer on linen 52″ x 50.5″

by Lidia Yadlos

Anita Rogers Gallery is delighted to unveil “Superunknown,” a captivating exhibition showcasing the latest creations by artist Henry Mandell. This marks Mandell’s debut solo exhibition at Anita Rogers Gallery, offering an opportunity to immerse yourself in a world of abstract art born from the depths of experimentation, scientific exploration, and the enigmatic aspects of the human experience.

Mandell’s artistic journey is a unique fusion of art and science, where he pioneers unconventional approaches to craft mesmerizing abstract artworks. At the heart of “Superunknown” lies an intriguing process that transforms written narratives, stories, and data into visually striking abstract compositions.

Through the meticulous manipulation of digital tools, Mandell embarks on a transformational journey, transcending words into a realm of abstract imagery.

Mandell’s process begins with a departure from the conventional use of iterative code, opting instead for a purely artistic approach. Every creative decision is a manifestation of the artist’s mind and hand, marking Mandell’s distinctive fusion of the digital realm with traditional painting.

One of the prominent series in “Superunknown” showcases intricate multilayered objects, constructed from a web of fine colored lines transformed from text related to dark matter and the universe’s fabric. Each line represents a distinct letter, coming together to weave an otherworldly tapestry.

The “Satoshi’s Garden” Series

“Satoshi’s Garden,” another series within “Superunknown,” offers a glimpse into a realm of swirling vortexes, adorned with chimerical limbs and primordial roots. These mystifying forms draw inspiration from the interconnected network of mycelium, hinting at the enigmatic creator of Bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto.

Just as the Wood Wide Web connects plant root systems through mycelium fungi, the Bitcoin White Paper linked a global network of computers through blockchain technology, both shrouded in a veil of mystery.

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La Voce di New York Spotlights Henry Mandell

Henry Mandell, Satoshi’s Garden 006, 2023, UV polymer on linen, 72h x 70w in

Is there a better option than spending the weekend immersed in galleries, exhibitions, paintings and photos? New York blooms in summer when it comes to art. Here you can find those that are about to open and those about to close.

–Federica Farina

Opening on Wednesday, September 6, 2023:

Superunknown by Henry Mandell at Anita Rogers Gallery (494 Greenwich St., Ground Floor) through October 14

Please RSVP to Info@AnitaRogersGallery.com to join us for the opening reception, September 6, 6-8pm.

ArtDaily Highlights Rachel Nicholson’s Solo Exhibition

Rachel Nicholson, 4 Objects with Pink Blue Grey, 2017. Acrylic on board, 8″ x 10″.

NEW YORK, NY.- Anita Rogers Gallery is currently presenting a solo exhibition of works by British artist Rachel Nicholson (b.1934). The painter, daughter of artists Ben Nicholson (1894-1982) and Barbara Hepworth (1903-1975), began her career in her early 40s and has since become known for her sensitive still lifes and landscape paintings. This exhibition will include works from both genres in acrylic and oil on canvas, paper, and board. This selection will be complemented by two works on paper by the artist’s father, Ben Nicholson.

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GALLERY SHOWS NYC Selected Gallery Guide: July, 2023

Rachel Nicholson, 4 Objects with Pink Blue Grey, 2017, Acrylic on board, 8″ x 10″

The best painting-centric guide to art galleries in NYC, Brooklyn, and Queens / Thanks in part to the Canadian wildfires, the hazy days of July are underway. They are perhaps not so lazy, though, as many artists are working full-throttle in the studio, hatching new ideas or preparing for upcoming exhibitions while dragging themselves away to openings at the summer group shows. I know I say it every year, but I love the off-season. Look for a listing update next week.

–Sharon Butler

Soho

Anita Rogers Gallery / 494 Greenwich Street, ground floor, New York, NY / Rachel Nicholson, A mug, a spoon and a landscape / closes Aug 26

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BLAST Art Market Report: Mark Rothko X William Scott

How many artists bathe in the reflected glory of stars like the American Abstract Expressionist, Mark Rothko (auction record $87 million)? Some are simply pastiches, existing to decorate wall space. Others bear more serious consideration accruing value by association. Thus New York dealer, Anita Rogers finds it stimulating to pair British artist William Scott (auction record a mere £1 million) with Rothko in her latest exhibition which runs until 3 June. The two crossed paths on both sides of the Atlantic in the 1950s, corresponded and compared notes. The pairing will, says Rogers, “solidify [Scott’s] significance, and offer new insight into their relationship and mutual admiration.”

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East Side Feed Features Mark Rothko and William Scott

Anita Rogers Gallery Presents Mark Rothko and William Scott: Continuing the Dialogue

By Bobby Panza

Portrait of William Scott (on left) with Mark Rothko (on right) at the Scott home in England. 1959. Photo by James Scott. © James Scott.

When Mark Rothko and William Scott first met in New York in 1953, both painters were at a pivotal time in their lives. Introduced by gallery owner Martha Jackson, Rothko and Scott had each evolved their artistic roots from figurative painting and were now charting new waters in the world of abstraction. The relationship between these twentieth-century masters is at the center of a thrilling new exhibition coming to Anita Rogers Gallery at 494 Greenwich Street from April 26 to June 3.

Large-scale works on canvas will be accompanied by preparatory drawings on paper as well as correspondence between the two artists. This historic pairing of Rothko (1903-1970) and Scott (1913-1989) has never been done before.

Left: Mark Rothko Untitled (Red, Yellow, Blue, Black and White), 1950 Oil on canvas 67 1/2h x 38 1/4w in 171.45h x 97.16w cm. Right: William Scott CBE RA, Abstract (Blue East), 1964 Oil on canvas, 73h x 48w in 185.42h x 121.92w cm

Similar to Martha Jackson who brought Rothko and Scott together, the female-owned Anita Rogers Gallery has been known for fostering relationships between artists, as well as collectors and lovers alike, since it opened its doors in 2016. This unprecedented exhibition will not only feature the relationship and mutual admiration Rothko and Scott had for one another, but also the influence and respect of opinion they had for one another, as both artists were also immigrants.

Rothko immigrated to New York City from Latvia in 1913 while Scott grew up in Scotland before moving to England to study at the Royal Academy Schools in 1931. Scott would eventually earn the CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) in 1966 for his contributions to art.

In the summer of 1959, the Rothko family were guests at the Scott’s cottage in Somerset, England. Both sides discussed concerns over placing art in public spaces, as well as their experiences as immigrants.

Now, the children of Mark Rothko (Christopher and Kate) and William Scott (James) will continue the dialogue at a special discussion at Anita Rogers Gallery on May 9. You can register for this free event here.

Anita Rogers Gallery is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The gallery will be publishing a full-color catalog featuring an essay by David Anfam, art historian and author of Mark Rothko: The Works on Canvas.

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ArtForum Must See: MARK ROTHKO and WILLIAM SCOTT

Installation view of MARK ROTHKO and WILLIAM SCOTT: Continuing the Dialogue (2023).

Photo by Jon-Paul Rodriguez

Thank you to ArtForum for listing our current exhibition, MARK ROTHKO and WILLIAM SCOTT: Continuing the Dialogue as a must-see exhibition. On view through June 3.

Book Launch | William Scott: A Family History by Cardwell McClure

The Friends of Fermanagh County Museum is organising a book launch on Saturday, 22 April, at Enniskillen Castle, showcasing Cardwell’s “William Scott: A Family History” publication.

Every Picture Tells a Story (90 mins) feature film based on the early life of William Scott, directed by James Scott with Alex Norton, Phyllis Logan and Natasha Richardson will be shown as part of this event.

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ABOUT THE BOOK:

The author of this family history is Cardwell McClure, son of Mary McClure, née Scott, the younger sister of renowned artist William Scott CBE, RA.  Cardwell remembers how his mother told him that William, when a teenager, would get his younger sister to sit for him lacking any other willing members of the family.

This book provides a first hand experience of the family’s trials through poverty, tragedy, war and fame.

There are twelve chapters in the book, eleven of which are devoted to each child, while the first chapter outlines the family beginnings in Glasgow, Scotland.

As Paul Teggart, the editor of the book says:  “It is a wonderful story of triumph over adversity, sadness and happiness, and family loyalty.  I can say, without a doubt, that the book is a labour of love and has only been completed after many years of dedicated research and a fine eye to detail by its author Cardwell McClure. It makes good reading whether you look at it from a family point of view or from an educational standpoint in examining the life and work of William Scott the artist.”   A chronology of the Scott family dating from 1887 to 2022 is also being published alongside the Family History.

The Family History book can be bought on Amazon via the following link: www.amazon.co.uk

William Scott: A Family History which has taken many years in research, writing and editing partly due to the ill health of the author, Cardwell McClure, is lavishly illustrated with paintings by William Scott CBE RA.

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Meer Spotlights Jack Martin Rogers

Jack Martin Rogers, Knossos, c. 1974, Oil on canvas, 56 1/2h x 84w in

Anita Rogers Gallery is proud to present Peregrination: from past to present, a solo exhibition of paintings and works on paper by British artist Jack Martin Rogers (1943-2001).

Peregrination takes the viewer on a journey through the artist’s lifetime and his travels through Britain, Turkey, Italy, and the Greek islands. Through paintings, sketches, and watercolor studies spanning over forty years, the exhibition offers insight into the mind of a painter, musician, and philosopher. Birds of prey play a prominent role in Greek mythology and ancient Greek texts; indeed, Homer often uses them as omens or signs from the gods, and Calchas, the seer introduced at the beginning of the Iliad, is said to “scan the flight of birds” to understand “all things that are past and all that are to come.”

It seems fitting then that Rogers would have been drawn to observing and painting this celestial subject; the artist was a profound thinker who spent his life studying history and classical literature, alongside science, anatomy, and technology. This interest in time and the interconnectedness of past and present is evident in his work, which often depicts historical and modern themes alongside one another.

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Greek City Times Highlights Jack Martin Rogers

Jack Martin Rogers, Nude, c.1964, Oil on canvas, 29 3/4″ x 24 1/2″

NEW YORK – Anita Rogers Gallery presents ‘Peregrination: From Past to Present’, a solo exhibition of paintings and works on paper by British artist Jack Martin Rogers (1943-2001) on view March 22 through April 22 at 494 Greenwich Street in Manhattan. The gallery will host an opening reception on Wednesday, March 22, 6-8 PM.

Peregrination takes the viewer on a journey through the artist’s lifetime and his travels through Britain, Turkey, Italy, and the Greek islands. Through paintings, sketches, and watercolor studies spanning over forty years, the exhibition offers insight into the mind of a painter, musician, and philosopher.

Birds of prey play a prominent role in Greek mythology and ancient Greek texts; indeed, Homer often uses them as omens or signs from the gods, and Calchas, the seer introduced at the beginning of the Iliad, is said to “scan the flight of birds” to understand “all things that are past and all that are to come.” It seems fitting then that Rogers would have been drawn to observing and painting this celestial subject; the artist was a profound thinker who spent his life studying history and classical literature, alongside science, anatomy, and technology. This interest in time and the interconnectedness of past and present is evident in his work, which often depicts historical and modern themes alongside one another.

The show highlights major oil paintings the artist completed while living in Greece, as well as watercolor works on paper, and preliminary sketches.  A curious and intuitive man who traveled extensively, crafted his own instruments, raised a family, and dedicated himself to art, Rogers spent his life seeking light, truth, and beauty in a turbulent world. In 1984, his family home fell victim to arson and much of his work was lost. Select examples of surviving works from that time can be seen in this exhibition, complete with evidence of the devastating fire; others exist now only in photographs. The exhibition aims to provide visitors with an overview of the artist’s career, from the early 1960s through his final years painting in the 1990s.

Rogers was born in Wiltshire, UK in 1943. He was classically trained in anatomy and fine art at the Birmingham School of Art. There, he developed his meticulous methods, especially evident in his preliminary drawings. He moved to the Greek island of Crete in 1962, where, inspired by the Greek landscape, history, and architecture, he entered his most prolific artistic period. He died in 2001, leaving behind an extraordinary body of work to his daughter, gallery owner Anita Rogers. This will be the artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.